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Chair’s monthly report October 2018

This report covers the period 13 September 2018 until 9 October 2018.

 Summary

Completed projects

The new stairs with an improved handrail between Hopetoun Street and Western Park are now open.

A constituent wrote to say “I have just discovered the new stairs to Western Park off Hopetoun. This is amazing and within metres it’s hard to believe you are not in the Waitakeres. Congratulations. You have created a wonderful place for those of us in the inner city”

Poynton Terrace connection between St Kevin’s Arcade and Myers Park (funded from the City Centre Targeted rate).  A safety audit is still to be completed on the design.

An interpretation sign in Te Hā o Hine place has been installed.  It explains the background to the Women’s suffrage memorial commissioned in 1993 for the suffrage centennial.

New Trees

10 elm trees at Grey Lynn Park’s Schofield Street entrance were removed because of Dutch elm disease. They have now been replaced by a mix of tanekaha and puriri.

 Representation Review

Every six years a review of Auckland Council representation arrangements is required including whether the wards properly reflect their populations. The outcome of the review applies at the next local body election (2019).

The Auckland Council review of the ratio of population to number of elected members showed four wards did not comply with the 10 per cent (more or less than the average) guideline. The Waitematā and Gulf Ward population differs from the average per member by 43 per cent.  The submission I gave at the Representation Review hearings (photo right) on behalf of Waitematā Local Board focused on the proposed Waitematā and Gulf ward boundary change (attached as an agenda item).

Following the hearings the council’s joint governance working party responded to submissions on the council’s proposal and decided to recommend changes to the council’s initial proposal.

The changes include retaining all of Grey Lynn and Westmere in the Waitematā and Gulf Ward. This was in response to submissions and public concern from the Grey Lynn area.

The working party also recommended to the council’s governing body that an area of Grafton should become part of the Ōrākei Ward in addition to the proposal for Newmarket and Parnell to become part of the Ōrākei Ward. (the recommendations were to be considered at a governing body meeting on 18 October)

The review does not impact the Local Board boundaries.

 Auckland Domain Committee

 At the Auckland Domain Committee meeting on 30 August 2018 a working group was set up to review the Accessibility Improvement Review Programme and its long-term implications.

The working group met on 14 September 2018 agreeing to a range of proposals to improve walking connections and parking management. The working group’s recommendations will be referred to the Domain Committee meeting to be held on 29 November.

At the same time the Local Board is progressing options for funding improved paths in the Domain.  At our September Business Meeting we requested Auckland Transport prepare rough order of costs for the following walking and/or cycling connections in the Auckland Domain as identified in the Auckland Domain Masterplan and/or Waitematā Greenways Plan and work with Community Facilities to identify the renewals budget available for each project:

  • Titoki Street carpark to Football Road from Parnell Train Station through the woodchip yard to meet the track leading to Lovers Lane
  • loop around Watsons Bequest, including path on north side of Domain Drive
  • upper connections to Kari Street Commons
  • Centennial Path to Grafton Mews
  • Park Road entrance to Grandstand Road South
  • path on The Crescent to connect the Wintergarden to the Auckland
  • Museum
  • path extension on east side of Domain Drive off Parnell Road to meet
  • Lower Domain Drive
  • path on east side of Domain Drive to meet Lower Domain Drive – not costed – part of Greenway and Auckland Domain Masterplan for cycling

Local Government New Zealand

As the LGNZ national council member representing local boards I attended the LGNZ strategy meeting on 4 October in Wellington.  LGNZ is focused on four priority areas – water, housing, climate change and localism.  Minister Mahuta attended the meeting to discuss the three waters review and water regulation.

Minster Phil Twyford attended the National council meeting on 5 October to provide an update on the new Urban Development Authority.

Helen Clark Room at Ellen Melville Centre

To coincide with the one-year celebration for the revamped Ellen Melville Centre, former prime minister Helen Clark was welcomed at an event hosted by the Local Board and the Auckland Branch of National Council of Women held in the room named in her honour. (Our Auckland story).  Photo right: With Helen Clark and Auckland’s National Council of Women chair Carol Beaumont

125 Suffrage Day celebration

The National Council of Women – Auckland Branch, Auckland Council and Auckland Live hosted a Sunrise celebration to mark 125 years since New Zealand became the first country where women were able to vote in a general election. The Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern led a parade from Te Hā o Hine Place to Aotea Square (photo right) for speeches and performances by Annie Crummer and New Zealand Poet Laureate Selina Tusitala Marsh MC’ed by Jennifer Ward-Lealand.   It was a very special morning to honour the fight for gender equality in Aotearoa.

I reported on why I am grateful for all the women who fought vigorously for the right to vote and for the right to stand for public office in my latest Ponsonby News update. 

Meetings and workshops 13 September until 9 October

  • Monthly comms meeting on 13 September
  • Domain Committee working group meeting at Auckland Museum on 14 September
  • Presented an ADO lunchtime learning talk “Auckland as a Cycling City: Dare to compare – Learnings from Velo-City Conference in Rio de Janeiro”  at Auckland Central City Library on 14 September at the invitation of Darren Davis
  • Catch up with Cr Darby
  • Meeting with Big Street Bikers to discuss their Ebike network strategy on 14 September
  • Weekly chair’s catch up held on 17, 24 September, 1, 8 October
  • Regional Cluster Workshop for local board elected members on 17 September
  •  NZTA road show discussion on the new National Land Transport Programme (NLTP) at the end of August that gives effect to the new Government Policy Statement (GPS).  This NLTP helps create a transport system that is safer, more accessible, better protects the environment and delivers value for money transport solutions for all New Zealand. The Transport Agency invites you to a conversation with our new Board Chair Michael Stiassny, Board representatives, Chief Executive Fergus Gammie and Director of Regional Relationships Steve Mutton to hear about how we’re partnering with local government to deliver on this new direction for transport. It’s all about enabling our economy to prosper and helping people get the most out of life.  By working together, we will create liveable cities, thriving regions, stronger communities and achieve the best outcomes for New Zealand by giving people choice on how they move about
  • Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 18 September
  • Meeting with Housing NZ representations on 19 September regarding the HNZ development at 139 Greys Avenue discussion prior to lodging Resource consent
  • Attended the Parnell Trust board meeting on 19 September
  • Catch up with K’rd Business Association GM on 20 September
  • Presented to the Joint Governance Working Party on the Waitemata Local Board’s submission on the representation review (attached as a report item on the October business meeting agenda)
  • Tour for members of the Western Springs Lakeside Park rock forest with Elizabeth Walker and Sel Arbuckle from STEPs – St Lukes Environmental Protection Society Inc on 21 September (photo right)
  • Waitematā Local Board workshops on 25 September and 9 October (the board had a recess week so no workshop was held on 2 October)
  • Central City Community Network meeting on 27 September hosted by Central City Library and guided tour of the Wahine take action Suffrage exhibition
  • Housing NZ bi-monthly meeting
  • Monthly catch up with the Board’s relationship manager
  • Meeting with the GM of the Newmarket Business Association and representatives of Newmarket Pool on 28 September
  • LGNZ strategy meeting in Wellington on 4 September
  • LGNZ National Council meeting on 5 October in Wellington
  • Monthly Chairs Forum on 8 October
  • Parnell Plan Working Group meeting on 8 October
  • Ponsonby Business Association monthly meeting on 9 October

Events attended 13 September until 9 October

  • Morning tea in honour of the Rt Hon Helen Clark in the Helen Clark room at Ellen Melville Centre on 13 September (one year anniversary of the opening of the Ellen Melville Centre)
  • Hīkoia te Kōrero: a parade in celebration of Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori at Aotea Square
  • GLBA networking drinks held at Malt to discuss the West Lynn upgrade proposals
  • Opening night of Mr Burns at the invitation of Silo Theatre on 14 September
  • Auckland Pestival 2018 held at Aotea Centre on Saturday 15 September Pest Free Auckland is a community-led conservation programme, facilitated by Auckland Council, to eradicate pests (pest plants, animals and pathogens) and concurrently restore the region’s native ecosystems. Partnerships with mana whenua, community groups, landowners, schools, the Department of Conservation, and the private and philanthropic sectors are key to the success of this programme.  As part of the Pest Free Auckland programme, Auckland Council hosted the annual Auckland Pestival to showcase community-led conservation, provide a networking opportunity and seek feedback on initial plans to support expanded delivery funded by the natural environment targeted rate
  • Launch of Mātātuhi Foundation on 17 September by the Writers Festival Trust at Auckland Central City Library – a new initiative to support the literary landscape of New Zealand
  • Sunrise Celebration with the PM on-Suffrage Day 2018
  • Opening night of Rendered on 20 September at the invitation of the Auckland Theatre Company
  • World Park(ing) day installations on Tyler Street and High Street as part of the Festival of Architecture (photo right)
  • Bad Jelly the Witch gala opening at the invitation of Tim Bray Productions on 22 September
  • Heritage Festival Opening on 26 September at Ellen Melville Centre
  • Auckland Boat Show on 29 September at the invitation of ATEED
  • Foreshore Heritage Walk guided by member Vernon Tava on 30 September for the Auckland Heritage Festival (photo right)
  • Hosted a significant birthday morning tea for board members and local board services team on 2 October
  • Beauty and the Beast at TAPAC at the invitation of TAPAC (four tickets) on 2 October
  • Late Night Art event on 9 October for Art Week
  • Biondi Brunialti duo concert at St Matthew in the City on 9 October at the invitation of the Italian Ambassador

 

Chair’s monthly report September 2018

This report covers the period 15 August until 11 September 2018 including the start of Te Wiki o te Reo Māori 10 – 16 Mahuru.

 Ko te reo te taikura ō te whakaaro marama
Language is the key to understanding

He pai ake te iti i te kore
A little is better than none

Summary

Waitematā Local Board August business meeting

At our monthly board meetings, we are fortunate to welcome a range of presenters to an often lively and interesting public forum.  Our August business meeting was especially well attended with presentations from:

  • John Elliott – Non-toxic non-herbicidal spray method
  • Elizabeth Walker and Sel Arbuckle of STEPS – Western Springs plantings on lava flow forest
  • Caitlin McIlhagga General Manager 95bFM – Presentation about 95bFM does and how it is involved with the community (photo right)
  • Jennifer Ward, Chris Bailey and Paula Wilkinson of Community- Led Design Group – 254 Ponsonby Road
  • Chris O’Brien, Chairman Laura Fergusson Trust; Rob Small -Trustee Laura Fergusson Trust and Simon Wilson, Managing Director Heineken Urban Polo – Heineken Urban Polo Tournament
  • Example of an urban tree that was felled following the removal of tree protection rules

    Graeme Easte, Albert-Eden Local Board Member – Meola Creek Catchment Update

Minutes are available on the Auckland Council website.

2006 – 2015 Urban Forest Canopy Changes in the Waitematā Local Board area

Last term the board initiated LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mapping to understand changes in the urban tree canopy. It has taken some time for the results to be presented due to a number of technical challenges.  At our August meeting we received the draft ‘Tree loss in the Waitematā Local Board over ten years (2006 – 2015)’ report funded as part of the Waitematā Local Board’s 2017/2018 urban forest framework project

The report highlights that the amount of tree loss in the Waitematā Local Board area 2006-2015 is 61.23 hectares (approximately 17 per cent) and that 65 per cent of the urban forest clearance has occurred on private land. This does not include the growth of new,canopy. Further analysis work is underway and will be the subject of a subsequent report.

A significant part of the tree loss has been caused by the removal by the former central government of Council’s general tree protection rules so we urge the Governing Body to advocate to government to change the law to enable Auckland Council to reintroduce general tree protection rules.

 Western Springs Lakeside Park Development Plan consultation

 A draft park development plan for Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea Lakeside Park was out for consultation until the end of August.

The Board held an open day at the park playground on 18 August (photo right Deputy Chair Shale Chambers and member Adriana Christie with local resident Chuck Joseph).  A number of people gave feedback not just about the park plan but about concerns over current maintenance issues.

I logged these issues and in response received the following updates:

  • Bird numbers no longer managed – unfortunately we missed the opportunity last Spring to train our contractors in conjunction with the Zoo hence the rise in bird numbers this year. We are now working with our contractors and the zoo and will undertake the seasonal addling of the eggs this Spring.
  • Paths no longer swept – all bird poo washed into the Lake – Paths are blown and water blasted once a week and are contractors are aware that bird faeces should not be washing into the lake. We have reiterated this with our contractor and we have increased the frequency of water blasting to 3 x a week as of Tuesday this week.
  • Broken drinking fountains – There are a couple of water fountains that have no active water pipe feeding it due to them being broken by tree roots coming up through the concrete. These have not been working for a number of years and this will be addressed as part of the Western Park project works.
  • Broken toilets at the playground with dirty Portaloo replacements – The zoo is constructing a new administration building on the site of a previous building that has been removed. Unfortunately, when the Zoo staff began work it was discovered that the western spring toilet had been connected to this facilities waste water line. This was unknown to the zoo project team and was not recorded on any plans so reinstatement of the sewer line was included in the design for the new building. Community Facilities are working with the zoo project team and have devised a methodology for a new connection, so we can recommission the toilets. Whilst the work may not be expensive it is complex given the significant amount of volcanic rock and protected trees along the pathway for a new connection.  The new work will require a consent and arborist approval before works can commence. We hope to have the toilets reinstated before the summer season starts.
  • In the interim alternative facilities are provided and these are cleaned twice daily with the expectation this meets the same outcome as permanent toilets by way of cleanliness. If this is found not to be the case a request for service can be called through and our contractor will attend.
  • Broken light in toilet block in park – disconnected due to the works going on at the Zoo.

We also received positive feedback from “Friends of Fukuoka Gardens” community group who have been working directly with contractors to improve maintenance of the Japanese garden.

It is proposed that issues such as water quality and bird feeding will be addressed through the plan.

Salisbury Reserve consultation and removal of the Masonic Lodge

Land purchased to create an entrance way to Salisbury Reserve

Consultation on the two options for opening up the entrance to Salisbury Reserve ended at the end of August.  During the month I met on site with both local residents and representatives of the Herne Bay Residents Association.  I confirmed that the local board doesn’t intend revisiting the decision to remove the Masonic Lodge building for a number of reasons:

  • We don’t have a budget to upgrade it, to cover operational costs nor to pay for a change to the required resource consent (which will be opposed by local residents).
  • There is no evidence of a need for another community facility serving Herne Bay.
  • Current facilities including Leys Institute Hall and the Vermont Centre are not at capacity. I also provided the occupancy stats below of local facilities that directly report to Council.
  • The reserve is not large enough to support two community facilities.
  • There are minimal heritage values associated with the building as it has been through so many alterations.

The standard available hours in 10h/day and the percentages below is based on the standard.

Utilisation                                                 FY16/17           FY17/18

Leys Institute Hall                                             16%                 20%

Freemans Bay Community Hall                    38%                 39%

Grey Lynn Community Centre                       55%                 53%

Ponsonby Community Centre                         37%                  36%

Leys Institute Gym                                            59%                  57%

Central City Library opening hours
The board made funding available so the Auckland Central City Library can open for an extra hour on Saturdays and Sundays from September 1. Funding is guaranteed until 30 June 2019.

Transport

John Street, Ponsonby – a trial for a new “healthy streets” approach

As a narrow street and rat run John Street in Ponsonby has suffered from a number of parking, traffic and safety issues going back some time.  The transport portfolio has been following up with a group of residents who would like to be part of the solution.  They are keen for John St to be used to showcase AT’s new approach to safer, healthier streets which are designed for all road users not just cars.

On 18 August I met with residents on the street to discuss potential options. I confirmed that the Local Board is pushing AT to use all the tools available to improve the conditions of John Street. AT is currently preparing a proposal for consultation.

Grey Lynn Parking

The local board passed the following resolution at our business meeting on 21 August in response to the parking concerns that have been raised with us in response to a letter drop to 600 Grey Lynn households opposing a proposed time restricted parking zone.

MOVED by Chairperson P Coom, seconded by Deputy Chairperson S Chambers:

That the Waitematā Local Board:

  1. receive the Auckland Transport August 2018 update report
  2. request Auckland Transport to implement the proposed new Arch Hill and Grey Lynn residential parking zone as soon as reasonably practicable and put on hold the proposed implementation of the time restricted P120 zone that has not been consulted on until after an assessment has been made of the impact of the residential parking zone
  3. request Auckland Transport work with the Grey Lynn Residents Association to identify suitable locations for P120 restrictions.

In response to the resolution AT has confirmed that the RPZ implementation will be brought forward to December and they will put on hold the time restricted parking.  Further details are on the Auckland Transport website.

Waitematā Safer Routes

Concept design for West Lynn, Richmond Road

New designs prepared by Boffa Miskell to fix the issues on the two Waitematā Safer routes were presented to Community Liaison Groups (CLGs) on 5 September.  A few days later the NZ Herald reported that the Grey Lynn cycleway debacle could cost $35m to fix and claimed that the project was for a few “existing cyclists”.   Grey Lynn Business Association co-chair Irene King was reported as saying that preliminary designs as “very, very stunning” with beautiful urban design and landscaping.

There is a lot that Auckland Transport has got wrong with this project and it should have been done correctly first time (I have previously reported on the background and what went wrong) but it is far is more accurate to describe the project as a street upgrade as it covers a safety improvements for everyone, bus stop changes, bus stop changes, traffic lights, parking, stormwater, landscaping and new trees.  Auckland Transport has also confirmed the figure of $35m is incorrect and should not have been presented to the CLG.   The actual projected cost for this project sits between $17m-$22m at present. AT has explained the figure of $35m was an initial costing that had long since been refined but was unfortunately inserted into the presentations to the CLGs and wasn’t caught until it was too late.

Auckland Transport plans to take the proposals out for consultation in Novembers so the wider community can decide what should be prioritised within the available budget.

Road Safety

My latest Ponsonby News column covers the 9th anniversary of speed reduction on Ponsonby Road and the speed bylaw proposals that are shortly to go out for consultation (Attachment 1).  Deaths and Serious injuries (DSi) across Auckland have increased by 67% since 2013.  In Waitematā 77% of all DSi involved vulnerable road users, people walking or cycling. This is the highest percentage among all Local Boards.

I was really pleased to see Auckland Transport’s CEO strong leadership and uncompromising statement on safer speeds in a letter to NZ Herald on 10 September (right).

On 5 September I attended a business strategy workshop in Wellington as a committee member of Trafinz.  The New Zealand Local Authority Traffic Institute or Trafinz represents local authority views on road safety and traffic management in New Zealand. It exists to lobby the government, to influence decision making on road safety and traffic issues. It also acts as a forum for collectively pursuing traffic issues of interest to local authorities, and for sharing information and advice.

Trafinz is actively involved in the development of a new road safety strategy with a Vision Zero target.

Meetings and workshops: 15 August until 11 September 2018

  • Meeting with local residents on 15 August at the Masonic Hall regarding the Salisbury Reserve consultation
  • Auckland Paths working group meeting on 16 August
  • Meeting with Steve Mutton, Director Regional Relationships on 17 August
  • Met with John Street, Ponsonby residents on 18 August to discuss options to traffic calm and reduce volumes
  • Attended the Western Springs Development Plan consultation event held at the park on 18 August
  • Chair’s weekly meeting with the local board services team on 20, 27 August and 3 and 10 September
  • Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 21 August
  • LGNZ Zone 1 meeting on 24 August in Manukau
  • Spoke to Citizens Advice Bureau Grey Lynn/Ponsonby Branch volunteers on 27 August about the role of the local board
  • Board all day workshops on 28 August and 4, 11 September
  • Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association meeting on 29 August
  • Meeting with Jeremy Hansen, Britomart Group on 29 August
  • Attended a Vision Zero meeting organised by Bike Auckland at Bizdojo on 29 August
  • Meeting with representatives of the Herne Bay Residents Association on 29 August the Masonic Hall regarding the Salisbury Reserve consultation
  • Interviewed by Grant Hewison regarding the Ponsonby Business Association strategic plan on 29 August
  • Auckland Domain Committee workshop followed by the public committee meeting on 30 August
  • Inclusive governance in a diverse Auckland workshop offered by the Kura Kawana Elected Member Development Programme with guest speaker Professor Paul Spoonley, Pro Vice-Chancellor – College of Humanities and Social Sciences, Massey University on 31 August
  • Kia whai whare atou katoa: Regional, cross-sectoral homelessness plan for Auckland workshop at the Fickling Centre on 3 September (photo right)
  • Meeting on 4 September with the Community–led Design Group to discuss 254 Ponsonby Road in preparation for the forthcoming Options Paper.
  • TRAFINZ workshop in Wellington on 5 September
  • Visit to Auckland Zoo for local board members on 6 September (photo right)
  • Catch up with City Centre Residents Group representative on 6 September
  • Transport portfolio catch up on 7 September
  • Meeting with Director Regulatory Services Penny Pirrit to discuss compliance issues at the helicopter boat shed construction on Sentinel Beach, Herne Bay
  • Attended the “Business Grey Lynn” organised community meeting at St Columba church on 9 September regarding the Representation Review consultation that closed on 11 September
  • Local Board Chairs’ Forum on 10 September
  • Ponsonby Business Association committee meeting on 11 September
  • Briefing by Heart of the City regarding their street guardians initiative

Events and functions:  15 August until 11 September 2018

  • Interview on 95 BfM on 15 August to discuss the development of green spaces
  • Opening night of Auckland Theatre Company’s Filthy Business at ASB waterfront Theatre on 16 August at the invite of ATC
  • Dropped by 95bFM: Drive Island w/ Ha the Unclear & Skilaa at Ellen Melville Centre on 17 August (photo right)
  • Walters Prize opening at Auckland Art Gallery on 17 August
  • Panel member with MP Deborah Russell and former MP Damien Fenton at the Central Auckland Labour LEC’s Locally Left event at the Grey Lynn RSC on 27 August (photo below)
  • Opening of the Mina and Courtney Pellow NZFW show pop up shop on 30 August at the invite of the K’Road Business Association (photo right)
  • Living Wage Employer celebration held at the Ellen Melville Centre on 3 September (photo below)
  • “Into the Underworld” exhibition opening on 8 September in Silo 6, Wynyard Quarter.
  • Officiated at the Town Hall citizenship ceremony on 11 September.

Chair’s monthly report August 2018

This report covers the period 15 July until 14 August 2018.

Summary

Western Springs Development Plan consultation
A draft park development plan for Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea Lakeside Park has been released for public feedback.
The vision outlined in the draft plan for the park includes improved water quality in the lake and streams, connecting the surrounding areas via paths, and improvements to event infrastructure. The focus of the plan is on improving the existing state of a well-loved park without making major changes.
Consultation is open until 27 August.

Salisbury Reserve consultation

Land purchased to create an entrance way to Salisbury Reserve

12 Argyle Street, Herne Bay was purchased by the former Auckland City Council to improve the entrance to Salisbury Reserve. There are two draft options out for consultation. In both options the pathways into the reserve are improved with additional lawn and trees. The main difference between the options is whether or not to provide car parking on the reserve. We want to ensure the community can consider the best use of valuable green space. The old Masonic Hall on the site will be removed with as much of the building material recycled as possible. For a number of reasons (outlined in a post here) it wasn’t possible to retain the hall, but we have committed to improving the clubrooms that are in the reserve and making them more user friendly (the clubrooms are leased to the Herne Bay Petanque Club, but available to hire). There is $25,000 in the budget for the coming financial year to refurbish the bathrooms on top of other renewal work that has recently taken place.
Consultation on the two options has been extended until 30 August.

Teed Street upgrade celebration

On 18 July we celebrated the Teed Street upgrade with the Newmarket Business Association and local retailers. It was an opportunity to acknowledge everyone who had worked on the project and to bless the new art work commissioned for the upgrade by Ray Haydon. Our Auckland story and more photos here.

New art work in the City Centre

Light Weight O by artist Catherine Griffiths which is hanging between 1925 heritage buildings the Royal Exchange and Administrator House was opened on 1 August. Member Richard Northey gave a speech on behalf of the Local Board.
The work was commissioned as part of the O’Connell St laneway upgrade and was funded through the regional public art budget and city centre targeted rate.

LGNZ conference in Christchurch 15 – 17 July

I attended the annual LGNZ Conference in Christchurch 15 – 17 July as a National Councilmember and local board representative. For the conference I facilitated one of the workshops on Climate Change. I was also one of Auckland Council’s four delegates to the AGM held on 15 July. My conference report back will be tabled at the business meeting on 21 August.

Agrichemical-free parks

A number of parks within the Waitematā Local Board area are going agri-chemical free. The first parks to benefit will be Albert, Western and Myers, with the non-sports sections of Victoria Park also included.

More than $70,000 has been allocated to the initiative, which comes in response to public feedback during the Local Board Plan and Local Board Long-term Plan consultation processes. Our Auckland story with more details here

Waitematā funded or supported projects underway or completed

Parking updates
Thanks to the efforts of the Parnell Business Association and Parnell Community Committee Auckland Transport has agreed to fast track the implementation of the proposed changes. There are still a number of issues to resolve regarding how the current scheme is working for local residents.
In Grey Lynn Auckland Transport is planning on installing signage for the Residential parking zone by December with go live in February or March. However, concerns have been raised with me regarding AT’s proposal to introduce a time restricted parking zone that was not previously been consulted on.

On College Hill following consultation Auckland Transport will now proceed using a graduated rate structure which will charge $1/hour for the first 2 hours and $2/hour for subsequent hours. The rate structure will align with recent changes to on-street parking along Ponsonby Road and while it will have minimal impact on short-term parking utilised by customers and visitors, Auckland Transport expects that it will encourage parking availability.
Further details are on the Auckland Transport website.

New network bus changes
On 8 July Auckland Transport launched a new bus network for Auckland’s central suburbs. Most services have changed, including bus routes, route numbers, timetables and some bus stops. In the Waitematā area the changes appear to be working smoothly with a few exceptions. I have received complaints regarding the removal of services from Williamson Ave (this is also subject to a local petition), removal of a service to Herne Bay from downtown and the fact the Westmere service stops just short of the shops. Auckland Transport has advised that there will be review of the New network operations after 6 months.

Meetings and workshops: 15 July until 14 August 2018

  • LGNZ National Council meeting on 15 July
  • LGNZ AGM on 15 July
  • LGNZ Conference in Christchurch 15 – 17 July
  • Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 17 July
  • Catch up meeting with Local Board services team on 18 July
  • City Centre Advisory Board meeting on 18 July (as alternate to Deputy Chair Shale Chambers)
  • Board all day workshops on 24 and 31 July and 7 and 14 August
  • Chair’s weekly meeting with the local board services team on 23 and 30 July and 13 August (in our workshop on 23 July we received an update on accountability reports submitted from groups who had received community grants – Attachment 5)
  • Meeting to discuss achievements report on 23 July
  • Comms meetings on 23 July and 2 August
  • Transport portfolio catch up on 24 July
  • Wynyard Quarter Transport Management Association meeting on 24 July
  • Joint Governing Body / Local Board Chairs Meeting on 24 July
  • Meeting with members of the Consulate of the Republic of Korea in Auckland to discuss K-Pop Dance workshops during Mental Health Awareness week
  • Relationship manager monthly meeting on 26 July
  • Newmarket Business Association board meeting on 26 July (as alternate for member Rob Thomas)
  • Housing NZ bi-monthly meeting on 26 July
  • Meeting with representatives from Summerset Parnell development on 27 July
  • Meeting with participants of the Smart Seeds challenge
  • Parnell Plan working group meeting on 30 July
  • NZTA scene setting briefing for Councillors and Local Board chairs re Auckland’s light rail projects on 1 August
  • Meeting with representatives of the National Butterfly Centre project on 2 August
  • Local Board Resource Consent and Planning workshop on 6 August covering the resource consent and planning lead role covering:
     the Auckland Unitary Plan
     developing effective local board feedback for notified resource consents, plan changes and notices of requirement
     presenting feedback at a hearing
  • Auckland Cricket and Grafton Cricket Club introductory meeting on 7 August to discuss their strategic plans and upcoming events
  • Meeting with Auckland Transport to discuss options for traffic management improvements at Newton School
  • Parnell Business Association annual presentation to the local board on 9 August
  • Community Liaison Group meeting on 9 August for the Pt Chev/Meola Road cycleway project held at Pt Chev School.
  • Drop in session for the Facility Partnerships Policy Project consultation held at Ellen Melville Centre on 10 August
  • Local Board Chairs’ Forum on 13 August

Events and functions: 15 July until 14 August 2018

  • Teed Street upgrade celebration on 18 July
  • How We Win Change: A Bike Auckland presentation with Paul Steely White at Mason Bros building on 19 July
    How to be a Voice for Change: Towards Safer Streets for Auckland workshop with Paul Steely White hosted by Bike Auckland at Ellen Melville Centre on 21 July
  • InMotion Matariki all-wheels illuminated parade 2018 Hosted by Touch Compass Dance Trust on 21 July
  • Officiated at the Town Hall citizenship ceremony on 23 July
  • Attended the Campaign for Better Transport AGM with a presentation by AT CEO Shane Ellison
  • Attended the 2Walk and Cycle conference dinner on 31 July in Palmerston North for the Bike to the Future Awards at the invitation of NZTA (I was one of the judges for the awards)
  • Morning tea with Grey Lynn library staff on 2 August (photo bottom)
  • Auckland Conversations – Healthy Streets for Auckland presentation by Lucy Saunders and panel discussion at the Viaduct Events Centre on 2 August (photo right)
  • AT Cycling & Walking, Women in Urbanism and Boffa Miskell hosted presentation by Lucy Saunders at Boffa Miskell on 3 August
  • Opening night of HIR on 3 August at Herald Theatre at the invitation of Silo Theatre
  • Wynyard Quarter 7th birthday celebration on 4 August
  • Opening on 7 August of Moana, a large- scale mural painting by Ahota’e’iloa Toetu’u at the South British Insurance Company Limited Building (photo right of the artist and Paul Baragwanath who commissioned the art work)
  • Street Talks: Urban Japan: Lost in Translation? presentation hosted by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport, ARUP and the Auckland Design Office at Auckland Central Library on 8 August
  • Presented on Local Board funding and advocacy to the Bike Auckland “Bike Burbs” hui held at Ellen Melville Centre on 11 August
  • Afternoon tea at the Grey Lynn Community Centre to celebrate the completion of the Re-purpose trial project by Grey Lynn 2030 and Earth Action Trust
  • Newmarket Business Association “State of the Nation” in Newmarket update at Event Cinema Broadway on 14 August followed by the movie “The Book Club” with ice cream and popcorn at the invitation of NBA.

Parks update for Waitemata Local Board

Ponsonby News: Waitematā Local Board update August 2018

One of the most important roles of the Local Board is to act as kaitiaki for our parks.  As guardians we want to ensure we maximise the valuable benefits our parks and green spaces provide.   We’re fortunate to work alongside many volunteers who undertake pest control, planting and generally keep an eye out for their local parks.  The Local Board agrees on priorities for the 80 plus parks and reserves located in Waitemata following feedback from the community.

You may have noticed that over the last couple of years more fun and excitement for all ages has been added to local playgrounds as they’ve been upgraded.   The latest work to get underway is to replace the play equipment in Sackville and Ireland Street Reserves.  For the Sackville Reserve project additional seating has been incorporated to make it a great neighbourhood spot for picnics and we’ve made the area more accessible with a new path from the street.  Construction is also due to start in late July on the Vermont Reserve playground. Basque Park and Home Street Reserve are next in line for long overdue attention with budget this year for investigation and design.

As reported last month by member Richard Northey we’ve taken steps to remove agri-chemicals from our parks following community support. As a start we’ve allocated over $70,000 to eliminate spraying in Albert, Myers and Western Parks and the non-sports field areas of Victoria Park.

Site of the old Masonic Lodge purchased to create an entrance way to Salisbury Reserve

There are two park consultations currently underway.  12 Argyle Street, Herne Bay was purchased by the former Auckland City Council to improve the entrance way to Salisbury Reserve.  The old Masonic Hall on the site will be removed with as much of the building material recycled as possible.  There are two draft options out for consultation.  In both options the pathways into the reserve are improved with additional lawn and trees. The main difference between the options is whether or not to provide car parking on the reserve.   We want to ensure the community can consider the best use of valuable green space.   For a number of reasons it wasn’t possible to the retain the hall but we have committed to improving the clubrooms that are in the reserve and making them more user friendly (the clubrooms are leased to the Herne Bay Petanque Club but available to hire).  There is $25k in the budget for the coming year to refurbish the bathrooms on top of other renewal work that has recently taken place.    Consultation on Salisbury Reserve is open until 16 August.

We would also like feedback on a draft park development plan for Western Springs Te Wai Ōrea.  Our vision for the park includes improved water quality in the lake and streams, connecting the surrounding areas via paths and making room for big events.  The focus of the plan is to improve the existing state of this well-loved park, without making any major changes.  You can let us know what you think about the ideas in the plan such as bird feeding and a tuna (eel) sanctuary until 27 August.  Basque Park and Home Street Reserve are next in line for long overdue investment.

In a unique co-governance arrangement with the governing body the local board also has responsibility for Auckland Domain Pukekawa.  We’re delighted that the Domain has received a prestigious Bronze Award in the 2018 International Large Urban Parks Awards, the only New Zealand park to receive an award. The awards recognise quality parks across the globe, the skills of the people who manage them and the value green spaces bring to cities.

Consultation information is on the Have your say page of the Auckland Council website.

Salisbury reserve consultation and the Masonic Hall

The Waitematā Local Board is currently consulting on options to improve the entrance to Salisbury Reserve in Herne Bay. It removes the removal of the old Masonic Lodge Hall on Argyle Street. Here is some of the background to the project. 

In August 2010, the former Auckland City Council purchased the Masonic Lodge at 12 Argyle Street, Herne Bay from an Open Space budget. At the time, the intention was to remove the building to open up the park and improve access and amenity. The former council requested that first consultation take place on the future of the building. In 2011 the Waitematā Local Board  proceeding with the public consultation.

Community views on use of the site and building were sought through a public consultation process in November 2011. At the time the hall was being used by Probus on a month by month lease.  A few other groups came forward interested in gaining access particularly performance and dance groups wanting to take advantage of the wooden sprung floor in the main hall. The majority of the consultation responses favoured retention of the building for community use, however a significant number of these were from supporters of the current user or a potential user. The responses favouring removal of the building were primarily from the surrounding neighbourhood.

The Board deferred a final decision on the future of the building pending advertising for expressions of interest to gauge the level of interest in use of the building. This was carried out in August 2012.  Three expressions of interest were received (only one from a local group) and following evaluation and discussion with the Board, one of the groups was identified as best meeting the criteria for use of the building.

Before progressing any further with the expressions of interest, confirmation of the resource consent requirements for the residential 6a zoned property was sought. The Board was advised that the Masonic Lodge was operating under a resource consent that was limited to lodge activities only and this cannot be relied on for ongoing community use of the building.

Taking into consideration the original purpose for buying the site, the lack of strong evidence of the need for a community facility in this neighbourhood and the time, cost and uncertain outcome of a resource consent application, as well as considering the benefits of the site to Salisbury Reserve as open space, officers recommended that the Board not proceed with the resource consent application, removes the building and incorporates the site into the adjoining reserve.

At the time of purchase in 2010 there was no evidence of the need for additional community facilities in this area. The location is not ideal, being surrounded closely by residential properties and away from neighbourhood centres and public transport routes.

Unfortunately due to the legal advice we also couldn’t  continue to make the hall available for any bookings so it was closed immediately pending a decision on the removal and a proposed concept design for the entrance. The Probus lease was also terminated at that time and the group moved to the Herne Bay Petanque Clubrooms in the reserve.

Once a decision was made to go ahead with the original intent of the land purchase we asked officers to look into options for relocating building so it can be used elsewhere.  However, after advertising the building and further investigations we were advised that as very little of the original villa remains there is no interest at all in  the building (due to the concrete block construction to the rear it is also very difficult to move intact). We therefore allocated budget to ensure the demolition involves recycling as much as possible.

Two options for the reserve entrance are now out for consultation.   I feel comfortable that we arrived at this point after thoroughly investigating options for the hall and we would have preferred for it to be in use if that had been possible.  The current consultation doesn’t seek to revisit whether the hall is retained (I don’t think that would be prudent based on what we know about the resource consent and the likely cost of restoring the building) but seeks feedback on how we can best create an entrance to the reserve as originally intended.

At the same time we also want to make sure that the existing community facility in the reserve is as accessible and useable as possible (subject to the requirements of the leaseholder). The board has allocated $25k in the budget 18/19 to refurbish the bathrooms in the clubrooms on top of other renewal work that has taken place there recently.

Read more

Consultation opens on Salisbury Reserve Plan  Our Auckland

Consultation documents and have your say feedback form

Consultation closes 16 August

Conference report back: Velo-city Rio de Janiero 12-15 June 2018

This report was included in my monthly Chair’s report on the Waitemata Local Board July business meeting agenda.

Report back from  Velo-city conference: Access to Life

I was fortunate to attend and present at the annual Velo-city Summit 2018, a premier international conference on cycling and urban mobility.

Velo-city conferences bring together those involved in policy, promotion and the provision of cycling facilities and programs. Engineers, planners, architects, social marketers, academic researchers, environmentalists, business, and industry representatives join forces with government at all levels ranging from municipal politicians, policy makers and educators in knowledge sharing in order to build effective trans-national partnerships to deliver benefits worldwide.

 Velo-city 2018 Rio focused on the main theme Access to Life, linked to the overall goal of cycling inclusion. Building on topics of previous Velo-city conferences such as Health, Infrastructure, Technology, Governance and Data, Velo-city in Rio explored the fusion of these discourses through cycling inclusion.

I found Velo-city to be energising, informative and inspiring. I have previously attended Velo-city 2014 in Adelaide. At that time, it seemed as if Auckland had reached a tipping point, but still had a long way to go to catch up with cities that had embraced cycling as a legitimate mode of transport.  Four years later I was able to present the Auckland story (surprising many people with the progress that has been made) and found it encouraging to have it confirmed that Auckland is on the right path to a sustainable, smart city.

As highlighted at the conference the benefits for all of investing in cycling are overwhelming. Attending the conference reinforced for me that we’re now at a stage in Auckland where we know why we need to do it, we’ve heard from plenty of overseas experts how we need to do it, we have the funding confirmed, community support and the political will – we just have to get on with it!

My top take outs from the conference:

Access to life The bicycle can literally mean access to life for communities around the world. We heard from Mozambique where a bike can save 3 hours of walking to access water (photo right: Rui Mesquita, CEO of Mozambikes).  In Chicago a bike is a vehicle for community transformation and provides benefits such as reducing violence and the creation of jobs (opening plenary speaker: Oplatunji Oboi Reed from Equicity, Chicago). In Brazil bikes are empowering black women and creating the conditions for gender equality (Livia Suárez Founder of La Frida Bike Café, Preta vem de bike and Casa La Frida – photo right- and Jamila Santana, Artistic Coordinator of La Frida Bike ). Access to life can also be achieved for children by making cities child friendly “A city envisioned through the eyes of children is likely to be a bike city not one for cars” (Eliana Riggio, International Child Friendly Cities Secretariat at the UNICEF Innocenti Research Centre, in Florence)

It is so much more than just the bicycle The focus of debate that I often hear in Auckland is whether people personally want to cycle that is often framed misleadingly as an attack on those wishing to drive.  The conference reinforced for me that cycling is part of a far bigger response to the challenges of our time.  When a city provides its citizens with viable access to cycling as mobility it creates an environment for everyone that is healthier, more sustainable, less polluting and acts as a generator of happiness.

Just to give one example that was highlighted at the Global Policy panel discussion session.  The obesity crisis is a bigger problem world wide than malnutrition. To add healthy activity to daily lives walking and cycling must be must be a “hidden” physical activity.

A city for everyone   A common theme from speakers across the conference was the need to prioritise inclusion in transport planning so that the city works for everyone. Rubbish infrastructure such as poor-quality footpaths is a huge barrier.  For example Rafaella Basile from Cidade Ativa gave an overview of problems pedestrians face in Brazil – lack of infrastructure, insufficient width, surface quality or lack of maintenance. She stressed that insufficient pedestrian infrastructure harms the most vulnerable part of society.

Getting the infrastructure right can promote social inclusion, accessibility and equity.

In Auckland the barriers to children walking and cycling to school has been recently highlighted by the AA.  Their surveys found that Auckland parents and some schools actively discourage children from walking and cycling to school due to a lack of safety infrastructure.

Mixing up mobility The transport sector likes to refer to “intermodal” to describe getting around by difference conveyances.  It would be great to come up with a new term as I don’t think a session at the conference on “intermodality” really explains itself to most people (at least not in the Auckland context anyway). However, what it aims to achieve when mixed up with cycling is worth signing up for.   As Pascal Smet the Minister of mobility in Brussels highlighted it is about moving away from a city for cars to a city for people “We need to talk about objectives, not about the means” 

From a number of speakers we heard the many ways in which the integration of high quality public transport, transport orientated design, bike parking, bike share and quality cycle highways can increase the range of riders can travel and the number of people cycling.

The presentation on Brussels had some great before and after photos (eg the car park transformation above) very similar to projects we are working on in Auckland such as repurposing the Eastern Viaduct car park into a new plaza and removal of the Dominion Road flyover.

 Build it and they will come, but we’ve got to get on with it There were many technical experts at the conference particularly from the Dutch Cycling Embassy and the Danish Cycling Embassy.  They can boast impressive infrastructure resulting in a high proportion of people cycling for transport.  As is well known the key to achieving this is a network of high quality safe, separated cyclepath.

However the presenters took care to note that cities like Amsterdam and Copenhagen were not always great places to cycle.  They just got started a lot earlier to re-prioritise road space. Photo right: Mirjam Borsboom from the Dutch Cycling Embassy showing a “before” example.  The Netherlands started on the path to embracing cycling in the 70’s after the “Stop child murder” campaign.

Mirjam was also generous to say that the Dutch had things to learn from other places such as on her visit to Auckland with the Embassy last year.

The importance of a Vision Zero framework – starting with slower speeds

Road fatalities are the first cause of death for 5-9 years olds worldwide killing a total of 1.3 million people annually. In a presentation on Vision Zero we heard that Mexico City are adopting an approach of putting the safety of children first. (Clara Vadillo Quesada, from “Vision Zero for youth” in Mexico City) Clara presented examples of tactical urbanism using paint to improve the safety of school zones (quick, cheap, effective methods that we sometimes struggle to do in Auckland).

In Auckland and New Zealand we are on the verge of adopting Vision Zero to address our road safety crisis of increasing deaths and serious injuries (In the past three years, Auckland deaths and serious injuries have increased at almost triple the rate of the rest of NZ and around five times the growth of travel).  I was interested to hear more about Sweden’s ‘Moving beyond Vision Zero campaign that was launched in 2017. As presented by  Lars Strömgren, ECF Vice-President (photo right) Sweden, aims to encourage traffic planners and transport decision makers around the world to improve upon the 20-year-old campaign “Vision Zero” by factoring in the health benefits of active transport. A new goal should lead to traffic that saves lives and improves quality of life in addition to reducing traffic fatalities and injuries by promoting active mobility in the form of cycling and walking (ie not implementing vision zero to make safety improvements on roads that make it less attractive to walk and cycle)

 What was also emphasised by other speakers is that where there is no separated infrastructure the best safety tool is to reduce speeds to 30km on residential streets. Work is underway on Speed Management Plans for Auckland that will bring in long overdue speed reductions.

Cycling as “new” technology  The technology plenary session discussion at the conference was excellent for providing insight about what is happening right now at the front line and how cycling can be considered “new” technology.

Tim Papandreou, former Chief Innovation Officer with the City of San Francisco, Transportation Agency with experience working on Waymo (Google’s autonomous vehicle project) spoke to the sunsetting of traditional transport as technology changes (where don’t need drivers operating systems in the same way people have been removed from operating machinery) and how the bicycle fits into the platform of tech and a menu of transport choices.

Ninna Hedeager Olsen, Senior of Technical and Environmental Affairs at the City of Copenhagen (photo left) took a no nonsense approach to technology. Her city is adopting leading Intelligent Transport Solutions for mobility, especially some of the unique innovations for cyclists’ traffic management. “Technology should make lives better for people, not be a goal in itself, and although low-tech, the bike is very effective in Copenhagen”

Kevin Mayne, Development Director at ECF, stressed the importance of cycling advocates and policy makers engaging with the emerging policy challenges and not leaving it all to the automotive sector to dictate. He sees cycling as part of “new” tech with the opportunities coming from bike sharing and ebikes to play a role in Mobility as a service (MAAS).  However, the first question to ask is “where is the walking”?

I took away from the discussion the need for Auckland to identify the problem we are trying to solve and to create and dictate the space that technology is invited into.  As Tim cautioned “AV technology has no moral compass” so AV tech will just go where it is allowed to go.

Blast them with data Tim also took part in the interesting Big Data session with Philippe Crist, Strategic Advisor for Innovation and Foresight, International Transport Forum at the OECD facilitated by Kevin Mayne.

Philippe strongly emphasised the need to start with “Why do you need the data?” in order to make good decisions about what data is requested from companies. Cycling gets overlooked because not “big transport” and traditionally detected. An issue that AV tech looking to solve however he warned against accepting a solution of “tagging” riders (or walkers). He also provided a warning about the in built data bias because of the different economic profile of owners of Apple or Android smartphones which can distort analysis.  Cycling at all levels has to get into the Big Data space and engage, in order to create data that works for our needs. As Philippe said “Don’t wait to be invited into the room, we have to create our own room where the technology people talk to us”.

Tim also spoke of the need for a city to establish first “What data is wanted for” to avoid a power struggle for data particularly where there are privacy concerns. However, the good news is that data science is changing fast so there are ways of extracting data without revealing personal information.

Tim provided some very practical and relevant advice about how best to use data to sell an idea. When advising decision makers, he starts with the story-telling rather than the data because we’re all emotional and that is what we respond to.  However, he puts this firmly in the context of the decision makers’ own agreed strategic framework backed up with data. Tim showed me the direct result of this approach on a tour of San Francisco at the end of my trip (see below). Safety inventions like kerb build outs are now going ahead without push back because San Francisco has adopted Vision Zero and they have the crash stats to identify dangerous intersections where intervention is required (eg photo right of a temporary safety measure).

Cashing in on the economic benefits:  We heard more on the overwhelming evidence that investment in cycling reaps economic benefits (eg Shopping by bike session).  Cycle tourism is more lucrative in Europe than the cruise ship industry (and less polluting).  650,000 jobs are as a result of the cycling industry (more than mining and quarrying).  From one study a 1 Euro investment has resulted in 35 Euros of benefit (Economic Benefits ECF research). I plan on following up with ATEED (Auckland’s economic development organisation) to find out what work they’re doing to promote cycle tourism.

In Vienna the largest shopping street has been transformed for walking and cycling. The opposition evaporated once opened due to the big lift in economic activity (photo right Robert Pressl, Project coordinator, CIVITAS).  ).  This was described as a “Lighthouse” project.  I think Karangahape enhancement project will come to be viewed in exactly the same way once finally completed.

Auckland’s story “I’ll just take the bike”

I presented as part of a session Cities for people? Rethinking Urban Planning  together with Mirjam Borshboom from the Dutch Cycling Embassy and Firoza Suresh from the Smart Commute Foundation, India . The session explored the necessity to refocus our planning away from a planning model based on individual motorized transport towards people-centre low-carbon sustainable mobility systems.

My presentation outlined how in Auckland we’re making the thought “I’ll just take the bike” a reality for Aucklanders and considered how far we are actually rethinking our urban planning.

A number of people approached me after the presentation to say how surprised and impressed they were to see the progress made in Auckland. I was proud to represent Auckland at the conference.

Summing up the conference

The conference was spread over four days with too many presentations to  attempt to sum up (check out the ECF website for the full write up about the conference). In addition to the key themes I found it really inspiring to hear from people working in really challenging places to bring about better conditions for people to ride bikes. For example Nikita Lalwani, the Bicycle Mayor of Baroda in Gujarat, India (appointed in May 2017 by BYCS, a Dutch NGO) who promotes cycling in a city with huge congestion but no cycle facilities. She does it because commuting by bike is still healthier and more convenient for her.

I enjoyed hearing about the compost business powered by a cargo bike and creating jobs (photo right). This is exactly what we need to be looking at in Auckland. The conference was an amazing opportunity to meet people from around the world doing really interesting things to create the conditions to encourage cycling such as Sile Ginnane from Liberty Bell in Dublin using a citizen-led low cost auditing system to gather qualitative data about the cycling and walking environment.

The conference was not without its controversies.   Participants from developing countries received a discounted registration that was still well beyond the means of average Brazillians.  The sessions were by a diverse range of speakers that wasn’t reflected in the make up of participants.

The cycling parade is a highlight of every Velo-city (photo right) but it wasn’t so great for the locals who had to put up with central streets being shut down for our convenience and enjoyment.

From a visitor perspective it was amazing to experience Rio and the spectacular waterfront ride.   On my trip I also enjoyed waterfront rides in Montevideo, Palma, Seattle and San Francisco.  It highlighted the huge potential to transform Auckland’s waterfront along Tamaki Drive into an even better mecca for tourists and locals.

I’m grateful for the opportunity to attend the conference (made possible by the generous airfare gift from a friend) and to have met so many amazing people.  I was able to explore new ideas and come home equipped with the questions to ask to ensure we deliver best practice.

Joke told by one of the speakers:  How do you recognize a cycle path in Germany?  There is a car parked in it.

(sound familiar Auckland?  Photo credit: Bike Auckland)

Presentation summaries

There are excellent write- ups of many of the speakers on the European Cycling Federation website.  I acknowledgement the assistance of referring to these summaries in writing up my report.

Attendance costs

  • Conference registration $NZ870.00 – covered by Auckland Transport (the abstract for my presentation was originally submitted by Auckland Transport)
  • Accommodation (3 of 5 nights) $NZ432 – covered by Auckland Council
  • Airfare – a birthday gift from a friend
  • All other expenses – transfers, accommodation (2 nights), meals etc – personal cost

Velocity Conference Side Event: The Big Picture: A Safe System for Cycling in Cities

At Velo-city I met Anna Bray Sharpin, a Kiwi based in Washington DC who works for World Resources Institute. She invited me to present my Auckland case study at a conference side event. Participants were from 12 developing countries with the potential to incorporate cycling as part of transport solutions.

Melinda Hanson from NACTO (National Association of Transportation Officials) gave an excellent presentation on Strategies for Scaling up Cycling.  Her 10 points summarizing the politics of “How” are really relevant to Auckland right now.

1. Show it works

2. Measure & promote

  • Bike counts
  • Economic benefits – speak to what politicians need to hear
  • Use new technology to track metrics eg origins and destinations

3.Reach out – move away from images of people on bikes wearing helmets to humanize cyclists

4.Support allies – eg bike advocates

5. Emphasise safety with a focus on speed reduction

6. Make cycling mainstream

7. Leverage the private sector – eg dockless bike share

8.Think about cycling as a big infrastructure project. Will be more eligible for multi funding

9. Be bold (Auckland’s Te ara I whiti/Lightpath was used as the example in Melinda’s presentation – photo above)

10. Don’t back down – example of Seville (StreetFilms: How Sevilla got its cycle network) that demonstrates the importance of a  bold vision (18km network built within 18 months for 32m Euros to achieve 8% mode share). Know there will be push back but trust the process and the outcome.

Checking it out up close – cycling tour of San Francisco

On route back from my trip I stopped off in San Francisco and was treated by Tim Papandreau  to a tour of cycling infrastructure that is transforming the city and significantly increasing cycling numbers.

 

Chair’s monthly report June 2018

This month I have prepared a brief update to be reported at the June meeting when Deputy Chair Shale Chambers will be acting. I am out of New Zealand 2 June – 15 July (including attendance at the Velo-city conference in Rio de Janiero)

Highlights

10 year budget

All Local Boards had an opportunity to present to the Finance & Performance Committee on their 10-year budget priorities.

I presented on behalf of Waitematā Local Board together with Deputy Chair Shale Chambers and member Adriana Christie (photo right).

The Board’s presentation is attached (Attachment 1).  We focused on seeking Governing Body support for the Board’s priority unfunded project – the development of 254 Ponsonby Road.

Local Government New Zealand

I have recently been appointed to the National Council of LGNZ representing Local Boards.  This position has been created in anticipation of a constitutional review of LGNZ’s rules to look at the representation of local boards and other sector groups.

My first official engagement in this role was to attend the 24th Central and Local Government Forum held at Premier House on 10 May (photo below).  Local government representatives were impressed with constructive level of engagement from the 14 Ministers who attended the forum.

The forum resulted in many positive discussions focused on the key areas of Water, Climate Change, Regional Development and Housing.

I also attended my first National Council meeting on 17 May and the Governance and Strategy Advisory Group meeting on 28 May.

Transport:

Tamaki Drive Cycleway

Local Board perseverance and advocacy pays off!  Auckland Transport has been working on the design of the Tamaki Drive cycleway between the Strand and Ngapipi intersection.  The board is very supportive of this project that will connect to the bi-directional Quay St cycleway however we have repeatedly raised concerns about Auckland Transport’s original proposal to maintain a small section of shared path between the Strand intersection and Solent St. We considered this to be an unacceptable safety risk for the increasing numbers walking and cycling this route.

We requested a continuous cycleway experience for the entire route (separating people on bikes with walkers) and the removal of the Solent St slip lanes to provide one controlled crossing rather than three. After the board rejected a number of design options Auckland Transport has finally agreed to progress a best practice design that delivers a high quality, safe and attractive cycling facility.  Construction is proposed to start in December 2018.

Road Safety

 As previously reported, Auckland is facing a road safety crisis with devastating consequences.  Auckland Transport board recently released a report called Auckland Transport: Road Safety Business Improvement Review, that concludes. “Road safety performance in Auckland in recent years … reflects a number of deficiencies of public policy at central government and local level. Most of all it reflects an absence of commitment to improving safety on New Zealand and Auckland’s roads.”

The Local Board has consistently advocated for Auckland Transport, NZTA and NZ Police to prioritise safety.

In some good news, Auckland Transport is proposing to install pedestrian crossings on Hobson St and College Hill (consultation ended on 14 June).

Regional Land Transport Plan

I prepared the Board’s submission to the draft Regional Land Transport Plan consulted on between 1 -14 May.

In summary the Waitematā Local Board supports the overall direction of the RLTP. It shows strong alignment between central government and Auckland Council and a real commitment to deliver a transport programme that responds to Auckland’s challenges.  It is reassuring that much of the draft RLTP reflects the transport objectives and initiatives set out in the Waitematā Local Board Plan.

We support the strategic approach towards creating an accessible, connected, safe and sustainable transport network. The RLTP aligns with the Local Board outcome: An accessible, connected and safe transport network with well-designed streets (Waitematā Local Board Plan 2017).

The Local Board supports the Regional Fuel Tax (RFT).  Seventy-two percent of Waitematā submitters to the 10-year Budget support the RFT and want investment to be focused on public transport and active transport.  We particularly support the focus in the RLTP on:

  • Safety, with a Vision Zero approach
  • Environment
  • Rapid transit
  • Accessibility
  • Placemaking
  • City centre
  • Active modes and pedestrian prioritisation

In addition to the projects identified below for inclusion in the transport programme, we request as a priority additional funding be identified to deliver the 10-year Programme Business case for cycling recently adopted by Auckland Transport.

The full submission is included as a report to the board’s June business meeting agenda.

During the consultation period I attended the Have your say session at the Grey Lynn Library Hall on 12 May with members Richard Northey and Denise Roche.

Further transport matters are reported on as part of Auckland Transport monthly report.

Parnell Plan

 Last month the board signed off on the draft Parnell Plan consultation document. “Towards a 30-year plan for Auckland’s First Suburb”  is now out for consultation until 29 June.

Details at https://www.aucklandcouncil.govt.nz/have-your-say/topics-you-can-have-your-say-on/parnell-plan/Pages/default.aspx

Our upcoming engagement sessions include:

  • 10am- 2pm, 6 and 16 June: Drop-in session at the Parnell Library
  • 9am-12pm, 9 and 23 June: Parnell Farmers Market
  • 5pm-9pm, 21 June: Winter Solstice event at 69 St Georges Bay Road

Auckland Domain Committee

The Committee met on 30 May (I am deputy chair of the committee). We approved a new natural play space and the Kari Street Commons informal recreational space.     The committee is grappling with the issue of commuter parking in the Domain that is diminishing the experience of Domain visitors and creating safety issues for pedestrians.  A report on a proposed way forward to improve access is coming to the next Domain committee meeting in August.

Community grants

At the Board’s May meeting we granted $125,000 in accommodation grants and more than $49,000 in community grants.

The board’s next Quick Response grants round opens on 5 June and closes 6 July. Details are on the Council website.

Events

Waitematā is a year-round busy place for an impressive range of events. Recently I have enjoyed attending:

  • Ockham Book Awards
  • 2018 Writers Festival opening – Gala night
  • Mt Albert Town Centre upgrade opening (in Albert-Eden)
  • GridAKL Tech & Innovation – Building a better world. The Funding Network Tech week event
  • Opening of the Art Fair at the Cloud
  • Opening of the Doc Edge Film Festival at Q Theatre
  • Bike Bike Debate at MOTAT on 31 May

On 25 May I attended the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei commemoration event to l mark the 40th anniversary of the stand at Bastion Point.  After 506 days of occupation, protesters faced off with members of the police, armed forces and the government over plans to build luxury housing on Ngāti Whātua ancestral land at Takaparawhau – Bastion Point, resulting in 222 arrests. The stand at Bastion Point led to the first successful retrospective claim hearing at the Waitangi Tribunal.

The Prime Minster held a morning tea event on 31 May for members of the Mt Albert electorate community.

Mt Albert Electorate community morning tea with the PM Jacinda Ardern

Chair’s Monthly Report May 2018

This report covers the period 11 April – 8 May 2018.  

 Highlights

10-year budget and Local Board priorities

The Waitematā Local Board received almost 1500 submissions on the Council’s 10-year budget and Local Board priorities. I enjoyed reading them all to understand concerns and what we need to improve on. It was also hugely encouraging to receive such positive feedback confirming we are heading in the right direction.

A summary of the feedback received was presented at a board business meeting on 3 May.  

Highlights include:

  • 72% support the regional fuel tax wanting the additional funding to be directed at improving public transport and walking & cycling
  • 81% support the proposed water quality targeted rate (to stop sewage going into the harbour)
  • 69% support natural environment targeted rate
  • 63% support the proposed rates increase of 2.5%
  • 83% support or partially support the local board’s priorities

Other themes

  • Support for additional Auckland Art Gallery funding of $20m
  • Support for Victoria Quarter city centre improvements
  • Support for Vision Zero to be included in the Auckland Plan 2050
  • Strong support for continuing to develop the Auckland cycling network with separated cycleways
  • Support for increased support to tackle rough sleeping and homelessness.

The Board’s feedback on the 10-year budget 2018-2028 and the draft Auckland Plan 2050 is available on the minutes to the 3 May meeting. We also approved our advocacy initiatives that will form an appendix to the Local Board Agreement 2018/2019.

Auckland Waste Management and Minimisation Plan

The draft waste plan was consulted on at the same time as the 10-year budget. We received 130 submissions from the board area.  There was a strong level of support for the overall direction of the draft plan and the proposals consulted on.

The board’s feedback (Attachment 1) was presented at the Waste Management and Minimisation Plan hearing on 3 May by the Natural Environment portfolio holders Denise Roche and Rob Thomas.

 Regional Land Transport Plan feedback

 The Regional Land Transport Plan (RLTP) lays out the vision for Auckland’s transport infrastructure over the next ten years- an accessible, safe and sustainable city and region.  The goal of the RLTP is to ensure that Auckland can address its current challenges and take advantage of future growth. The RLTP focuses on:

  • reducing congestion
  • improving freight reliability
  • road safety
  • promoting walking and cycling
  • advancing public transport.

The Board’s presentation to Regional Transport Committee hearing on the RLTP is attached (Attachment 2). The board’s submission will be finalised by 17 May.

Homelessness

We know from the feedback we regularly receive and through the 10-year Budget consultation that our residents would really like to see homelessness and rough sleeping tackled so we no longer have vulnerable people sleeping out on our streets.  The board has agreed to the following advocacy positions to be included in our Local Board Agreement 18/19.  At the same time we welcome the government’s announcement that $100m is to be invested in homelessness including an increase in the number of places available through Housing First, a solution that has been shown to work.

Housing solution for homeless people

Deliver short and medium-term housing solutions to address homelessness

  •  The Governing Body to partner with the Waitematā Local Board to enhance provision of city centre public facilities such as toilets, showers and lockers
  • The Governing Body to financially support the development of Mission HomeGround
  • The Governing Body to increase funding to support Housing First Auckland

Storm Damage

Auckland was hit by a severe storm on the evening of 10 April that caused wide spread power outages and the toppling of trees all over Auckland.  At Western Springs a number of large trees came down causing paths to be closed (the track through the Western Springs pine stand will remain closed while 30 pine trees are assessed that are at risk of toppling).   Our Auckland story on track closures: Attachment 3

Tree debris is being collected by Auckland Council’s contractor Ventia from the side of the road. There is currently a backlog that I have been advised should be cleared by the week beginning 14 May.

Auckland’s Road Safety Crisis

As reported on last month I attended the Road Safety Summit in Wellington called by the Associate Minister of Transport.

Tragically in the past three years, Auckland’s deaths and serious injuries (DSI) have increased at almost triple the rate of the rest of NZ and around five times the growth of travel. Of 29 world cities, Auckland has the second highest pedestrian fatality rate (Our Auckland story: Attachment 4).

Red light running is particularly an issue in the city centre. This has been highlighted at the intersection of Nelson Street and Union St on the Freemans Bay School walking route that has been subject of recent complaints (a video posted on social media showed seven drivers red light running in just one light phase). I have been following this up with AT and NZ Police who are yet to confirm what action is going to be taken.

I reported on road safety issues in the latest Ponsonby News update and the completion of the Ponsonby Pedestrian Improvement project (Attachment 5)

Monkey Bars are back in Grey Lynn Park

 The playground upgrade at Grey Lynn Park completed in November 2016 removed monkey bars from the design.  Following a petition from twins Ila and Jaya Patel (photo right) the Board agreed to fund new monkey bars.  The new equipment has now been installed (Our Auckland story: Attachment 6).

Meetings and workshops: 11 April until 8 May 2018

  • Weekly chair’s meeting held every Monday with the local board services team
  • Government Policy Statement on Land Transport – briefing session with transport strategy team on 12 April to discuss local board feedback
  • Catch up with Maggie Gresson, of Artists Alliance and board member Richard Northey
  • Meeting with Ian Clark (Director at Flow Transportation Specialists Ltd) on 12 April regarding Western Springs Precinct parking project
  • Breakfast meeting with Mark Ames from Strategic Cities hosted by Auckland Transport
  • Catch up with Jill Keyser from Splice on 13 April
  • April cluster workshop for local board members on 16 April
  • Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 17 April
  • Meeting on 18 April to discuss local board advocacy items
  • Ports of Auckland presentation for board members on 19 April draft 30 year masterplan
  • Board all day workshops on 24 April, 1 May and 8 May
  • Inner city network meeting at Auckland Central Library on 26 April
  • Meeting to discuss representation review
  • Monthly comms meeting on 26 April
  • Regional Land Transport Plan briefing by Auckland Transport for local board members on 30 April
  • Finance and Performance committee workshop on 2 May: 10 year budget update
  • RLTP hearing on 7 May (Attachment 2)
  • Ponsonby Business Association board monthly meeting on 8 May

Events and functions:  11 April until 8 May 2018

  • Regional Facilities Auckland tour of the Civic Theatre and function for local board members and advisory panel members on 11 April (photo right)
  • How London became a cycling city presentation by Mark Ames from Strategic Cities hosted by Russell McVeagh
  • Launch on 13 April at the Cloud of a trial of two city centre e-buses by the Mayor and Associate Minister for Transport Julie-Anne Genter (photo below right)
  • Popped into the  Waitemata Safe Routes drop in session at the Grey Lynn Community Centre on 14 April led by Boffa Miskell who have been engaged by Auckland Transport to lead a technical review of the Waitemata Safe Routes programme
  • Pump tracks are for girls too!” event with Sarah Walker organised by Women in Urbanism at the Grey Lynn pump track on 14 April
  • Eco Day Festival at EcoMatters on 15 April
  • Opening of Body Worlds Vital at the Hilton Hotel on 23 April
  • The opening night of Southern Star – Te Tonga Whetu o te Rangi on 24 April including live musical performances choreographed to architectural-scale, light artworks by Jeff Smith and Johann Nortje projected onto the historic brick and stone walls of St David’s. (My speech: Attachment 7)
  • Anzac day dawn service at the Auckland War Memorial Museum
  • Spoke on behalf of the board at the Grey Lynn RSC Anzac day service (My speech: Attachment 8). Photo below presenting the local board wreath with board member Denise Roche
  • Comedy Gala opening night on 26 April at the invitation of ATEED
  • Re-opening of the Richmond Road Medical Centre on 27 April by PM Jacinda Adern
  • Trash to Trade competition organised by Grey Lynn Waste Away at the Grey Lynn RSC on 29 April (photo below)
  • Mrs Warren’s profession opening night at the ASB Waterfront Theatre at the invitation of Auckland Theatre Company
  • Unveiling of Te Toka o Apihai Te Kawau by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei and Ports of Auckland on 4 May (photo right)
  • Foundation North lunch on 4 May to launch their Strategic Plan with the PM and Mayor Goff
  • Attended the Fossil Free Acceleration Tour with Bill McKibben and 350 Aotearoa at the Auckland Town Hall on 7 May
  • Feijoa Festival at Tabac, Mills Lane on 8 May

Photo right: Trash to Trade competition.  Grey Lynn 2030 trustee Brigette Stigid with board member Denise Roche who spoke at the event and board member Adriana Avendaño Christie who was one of the judges, alongside Metal as Anything Creations‘ Andrew Palace. The established artisans category was won by Jared Diprose from Goose Boards the new designer category by Fiona Bonner from Floroganza, and the young makers category by Briar Shaw-Smith.

 

Anzac day speech 2018

Grey Lynn Parade and Service

Tēnā koutou e ngā rau Rangatira mā e huihui mai nei

E ngā hau e whā

Tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa

Greetings to everyone gathered here this morning.

It is a great honour to be invited to speak today on behalf of the Waitematā Local Board. I’m joined by newly elected board member Denise Roche.

Laying the wreath on behalf of the local board with board member Denise Roche

We all come together this year on the 103rd Anzac day in the final year of the 100th commemoration of the First World War.

I give thanks to the Grey Lynn RSC for bringing us all together as a community to remember the lives lost and the huge impact of war on those who served and their families. I acknowledge the passing of president Rocky and sadly the many other life members who have passed in the last year.  Thank you to the club committee and new generation of members keeping the club going strong as a welcoming, inclusive place. The Local Board is pleased to be able to support your very special and unique Anzac day parade and service.

We have all come together, not to glorify war, but to commemorate New Zealanders, Australians and Pacific peoples who served and died in all wars, conflicts and peacekeeping operations and share the sorrow at the loss and suffering of so many lives in war including those opposing war.

Of 74,000 New Zealanders who served in World War 1 on the Western Front between August 1914 and November 1918,  nearly 14,000 lost their lives. Those who volunteered for the war effort on behalf for the British Empire included approximately 1000 men from the Pacific Islands, including 500 from the Cook Islands and 150 from Niue.

In April 1918 war raged. Heavy causalities continued until armistice day in November. It is this year that we move from commemorating war towards peace. We look to the journey home, to loved ones keeping the home fires burning, and the difficult time recovering from the terrible effects of war.

I give thanks for the ANZAC spirit of sacrifice, courage, commitment and giving which has seen NZ cope through natural disasters and rise to the challenges of our time. I tautoko the Prime Minister’s call, at a time when risks to global peace and security are growing and the rules-based system is under such pressure, that we must recommit ourselves to the cause of non-proliferation and disarmament, and to the norms and rules which support those endeavours.

We remember and reflect on ANZAC day together and work to ensure future generations do not face the horror of war. As we remember those who sacrificed their lives and honour those who served we recommit to the importance of peace, independence, fairness and freedom.

Kei wareware tātou

Lest We Forget

Kia ora huihui tātou katoa

 

Chair’s monthly report April 2018

This report covers the period 14 March until 10 April 2018.

 Highlights

Newly elected board member Denise Roche was sworn in at the board’s business meeting on 20 March. (photo left)

 

Consultation on the 10 year budget

Have your say month wrapped up on 28 March.  The Board hosted 2 public meetings, a hearings style meeting where 19 groups and individuals presented and four drop-in session at our libraries (photo right: Parnell Have your say public meeting attended by board members and councillors Penny Hulse and Christine Fletcher).  Spray free parks is one of the priority issues that was consulted on by the Board (Attachment 1)

A summary of the consultation feedback will be available in May.

New public space at the Viaduct

In October 2017 I reported that Panuku had made the decision to close the Eastern Viaduct car park to create a new public space in line with the Waterfront Plan. This followed advocacy from the local board and councillors Richard Hills and Chris Darby.

Following the space being used increasingly for temporary events it has now been permanently closed.  I attended the karakia on 26 March led by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to acknowledge the closing of the Eastern Viaduct as a car park and the commencement of the construction and installation process of a public space.

Over the Easter break I enjoyed having lunch with a friend at the new communal table (photo above).   See Attachment 2 for more details.

Homelessness

Chronic levels of homelessness in the city centre is a major concern. The board wishes to support solutions and is looking to provide appropriate public facilities (one of the priorities we highlighted in the recent 10 year budget consultation).

I attended the Heart of the City organised “ending homelessness” event on 20 March at the Ellen Melville Centre to hear the latest update from Moira Lawler, CEO of Lifewise,  and Chris Farrelly, the Auckland City Missioner on how they are working to end homelessness in central Auckland.

They talked about the collaborative approach underway, including Housing First and the redevelopment of James Liston Hostel and the recently announced Mission Homeground (incorporating accommodation and wrap round services) to be developed on the Mission’s Hobson St site.

 Western Springs Native bush restoration project

Residents were recently provided with an update (Attachment 3) on the Western Springs Native bush restoration project.  Attachment 4 the Our Auckland story on the project.  In addition, Deputy Chair Shale Chambers spokesperson for the project has provided this update on 10 April via Facebook in response to concerns about the process.

The elected members of the board do not, nor have they in the past, had any direct involvement in the selective cutting of the pine trees. This has been a decision of arborists and Council parks staff who are making health and safety decisions to keep the track and park area open, and keep property and lives safe. No assurance can be given that those decisions, where necessary will not be made in the future (for example, as a result of today’s winds) but this will only be done for genuine health and safety reasons, not any early implementation of the plans. That is in line with the local board’s advice that the trees are failing at an increased rate. The restoration project is shortly to go to a notified public hearing process. Those who wish to question the reports and advice that the local board has relied on in making its decision, in its view in the public interest, to proceed with the restoration project and the removal of the remaining 200 pines will have their opportunity there to have their say. The board will be bound by the outcome. The ‘consultation’ is therefore a publicly notified resource consent hearings process available to all interested in the outcome of the plans. We invite and welcome that involvement. Council advice can be tested there. If it is correct and the project is granted consent, the first stage pine removal phase of the project will proceed. Locals and interested parties will then be involved by way of consultation on in the detail post-pines future of the area and the park restoration project, as promised.

Victoria Quarter Petition

 At the Board’s March business meeting we received a petition presented by Emily Reeves, city centre resident, calling for safer pedestrian access in Victoria Quarter. (Attachment 5)

We passed a resolution requesting staff to refer the petition to the Development Programme Office for consideration in the allocation of the targeted rates projects in the Victoria Quarter and Auckland Transport for consideration for improvements in the road corridor.

Work is already underway by Auckland Transport on significant safety treatments in the Cook St off ramp area of Victoria Quarter.  The proposals will go out for consultation shortly.

 Great North Road – car transporters

I’ve previously reported on the issue of car transporters illegally unloading on Great North Road. This high risk activity continues despite AT regularly issuing fines (this is just considered a cost of doing business).

I’ve met with AT’s manager of parking who is calling a meeting of operators and NZTA to discuss the options available for increasing the number of loading zones and for businesses to undertake more activities within their premises. If car transporter operators continue to unload illegally NZTA has the power to revoke operator licences.

Quay Street cycleway extension greening

The board has asked Auckland Transport to look at options for further greening Quay St as part of the cycleway design.

At our March meeting we requested Auckland Transport to develop a rough order of cost for including a green bus shelter roof as part of the Quay Street project to be funded from the Local Board Transport Capital Fund (photo above right: cycleway under construction showing inclusion of a strip in the design for planting)

Events

March was a big month for events in Waitematā.  Pop, the Board funded annual series of interactive art projects is now a fixture of the Auckland International Arts Festival (photo right pop marbles in Freyberg Place).

At Pasifika the mayoral and government’s entourages joined forces for the first time to visit stages in nine of the villages. (Photo below: At the Tuvalu village with Fala Haulangi)

Meetings and workshops: 14 March until 10 April 2018

  • Weekly chair’s meeting held every Monday with the local board services team
  • Site visit on 14 March to berm on Beresford Street where poisoning has taken place (photo right)
  • Meeting with the Newton Residents Association representatives on 14 March
  • Fortnightly meeting with comms adviser on 14 and 29 March
  • Dropped by the Auckland Transport Karangahape Road parking plan consultation open days on 14 and 16 March
  • Meeting with Parnell Business Association representatives on 15 March
  • Have your say Grey Lynn Library drop in session on 15 March
  • Have your say Parnell public meeting hosted in partnership with Parnell Community Committee on 15 March
  • Have your say Leys Institute Library drop in session on 16 March
  • Surrey Cres/Garnet Road Community Liaison Group meeting hosted by Auckland Transport on 19 March
  • Have your say cuppa with Splice at Ellen Melville Centre attended by inner city resents particularly new migrants (supported by Auckland Council translator).
  • Waitematā Local Board business meeting on 20 March
  • Auckland Transport’s quarterly briefing for Local Boards on 21 March
  • Drop in session on 21 March for elected representatives at Albert St re: Sale and supply of Alcohol Renewal of Licences Amendment Bill (No2)
  • Participated in Auckland Transport’s consultations sprint at Customer Central (exploring AT’s end to end consultations process from the customer lens)  with a face to face interview on 21 March
  • Local Economic Development Masterclass; Supporting economic resilience hosted by ATEED at GridAKL on 22 March
  • Have your say Waitematā Local Board hearing on 22 March.  The Board received 19 presentations from a range of groups and individuals
  • Briefing from Housing NZ representatives on 23 March re the redevelopment plans for 139 Greys Ave
  • Hui on 23 March between Local Board Chairs and the Chair of the Tūpuna Maunga Authority and to discuss some activities planned for 2018 by the Tūpuna Maunga Authority.
  • Have your say Central Library drop in session on 23 March
  • Have your say Parnell Library drop in session on 26 March (photo right)
  • Parnell Plan working group meeting on 26 March
  • Board all day workshops on 27 March, 3 and 10 April
  • Catch up with KBA general manager on 28 March
  • Wynyard Quarter Transport Association board meeting on 28 March
  • Joint governing body and local board chairs workshop on 28 March
  • Relationship Manager catchup on 29 March
  • Monthly transport portfolio catch up on 4 April
  • Meeting with Manager, AT parking on 4 April
  • Meeting on 5 April with representatives of the Parnell Business Association to discuss Paws in Parnell event debrief
  • Catch up with CEO, MOTAT on 6 April
  • Meeting on 6 April with KBA and NZPC to discuss public facilities on Karangahape Road
  • Ponsonby Business Association committee meeting held on 10 April

Events and functions:  14 March until 10 April 2018

  • Grey Lynn 2030 AGM and Green Screen showing of Living Dangerously on 19 March
  • Ending Homelessness in Auckland’s city centre organised by Heart of the City at Ellen Melville Centre on 20 March
  • Far Side of the Moon at the Aotea Centre on 22 March at the invitation of the Auckland Arts Festival
  • Pasifika Festival walkabout with the Prime Minister and the Mayor
  • Government’s Unitec Housing announcement at Te Noho Kotahitanga Marae on 25 March (photo right)
  • Karakia on 26 March led by Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei to acknowledge the closing of the Eastern Viaduct as a car park and the commencement of the construction and installation process of a public space.
  • YMCA – Ride and Refresh Launch Event on 27 March (new service providing showers and secure parking for bike commuters) Photo right
  • Women in Urbanism discussion with NZTA on 28 March
  • Part of the official party for the Citizenship Ceremony in the Town Hall on 3 April
  • Associate Minister Transport Julie Anne Genter opens the Road Safety Summit

    Bike Breakfast on 5 April at Bestie café sponsored by KBA

  • Opening of the Uptown Business Association movie night in Basque Park on 7 April
  • Jam on Toast at the Grey Lynn Community Centre on 8 April
  • Opening of the Auckland International Cultural Festival at Mt Roskill War Memorial Park on 8 April
  • Attended the Road Safety Summit in Wellington on 9 April and gave a presentation on Auckland’s road safety crisis as part of a panel discussion on Local Government’s view about what more can be done to improve road safety (Attachment 6).